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GLOBAL IMPORTERS OF COLOMBIAN COFFEE

GLOBAL IMPORTERS OF COLOMBIAN COFFEE

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COFFEE BY-PRODUCTS

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GREEN COFFEE EXPORTERS

GREEN COFFEE EXPORTERS

Contact:Juan Pablo Martinez
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Tel:(316) 692 05 41, (2) 224 62 12
Address:Carrera 52 59 - 918
City:Valle del Cauca
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Tel:(4) 8411367
Address:Calle 48 46-78
City:Antioquia
Website:
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Tel:(1) 2557348/310287942
Address:Calle75 4 -28Apt601
City:Huila
Website:
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Tel:(8) 8331367/8330256
Address:Carrera 23A 1-25 Sur
City:Huila
Website:
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Tel:(8) 8365236/3102226334
Address:Carrera 1 9-32 sur Barrio Panorama
City:Cundinamarca
Website:
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Tel:(1) 2153310
Address:Calle 121 9-78 (201)
City:Cundinamarca
Website:
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Tel:(1) 8985337
Address:Calle67 7-94Of404
City:Cundinamarca
Website:
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Tel:3204903470
Address:Carrera 14 # 23 - 15 Edificio Camara de Comercio Piso 8 of 802
City:Quindío
Website:
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Tel:3122860561
Address:Edificio Camara de Comercio Piso 4 (Calle 14 Norte # 10 - 05 La Castellana
City:Quindío
Website:
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Tel:(6) 7371815
Address:Armenia) Calle 51 6-106 Bodega 4
City:Quindío
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3311000
Address:Calle 5 19-25 Apt 601 Tacaragua
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3609726 / 3113248693
Address:Calle 8 8-44
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3459296/3113442838
Address:Calle 22 Carrera 8 Esquina Edificio Camara de Comercio Of 1503/ Carrera
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:(2) 8252518- 3113335848
Address:Carrera 9 16-60
City:Valle del Cauca
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3119963
Address:23 # 14-V4i4a TAolcrarela1SLeactBoorhNe.mSoial Trilladora Alexcafe /Calle 3A 20-32 Apt 501- B
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3279518
Address:Kilometro 10 Pereira - Via Cerritos Trilladora Santa Teresita
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3641125/3207276303
Address:Calle 14 13-19
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:3112129047/3108511250
Address:Carrera 10 6 - 71 Valle de San José
City:Santander
Website:
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Tel:3208423708
Address:Carrera 34 51 - 92
City:Santander
Website:
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Tel:76198975
Address:Calle 143 26 - 02 Torre B Apt 601 Barrio Condado Campestre
City:Santander
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COFFEE EXPORTERS   COLOMBIA

COFFEE EXPORTERS COLOMBIA


ROASTED COFFEE EXPORTERS

ROASTED COFFEE EXPORTERS

Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel:+57 3102229416
Address:Bogota. Cundinamarca
City:Cundinamarca
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Contact:Carolina Sánchez Gómez
Tel:(6) 320 30 90- 310 597 42 90
Address:mz 30 casa 34 Corales
City:Pereira, Risaralda
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Tel:(4) 8411367
Address:Calle 48 46-78
City:Antioquia
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Contact:Manager of foreign Trade
Tel:57 315 538 6340. 2 2143810
Address:Calle 10 N 6-87
City:Valle del Cauca
Contact:Juan Pablo Martinez
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Tel:(316) 692 05 41, (2) 224 62 12
Address:Carrera 52 59 - 918
City:Valle del Cauca
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Contact:Victor Cordero Ardila
Tel:+57 315 757 1423 +57 3 4333234 +57 3 4334641
Address:Km 3 Vía a Gaira Parque Logistico Industrial Bodega A13
City:Santa Marta
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Contact:JAVIER A. JARAMILLO G
Tel:+057 3113617596
Address:Calle 56 Sur # 40 B - 141 Int 501
City:Antioquia
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Tel:Tel/WhatsApp: +57 300 4828969
We speak English, call us!
Address:Calle 65 No. 24-14. Siete de Agosto.
City:Bogota
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Tel:+57 3117625838
Address:Vereda La Cauchera
City:Quindio
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Contact:Mauricio Villota. Gerente
Tel: (+57)3219711740
Address:Cra 4a No. 4-19 Barrio Avenida PLANADAS.
City:Tolima
Website:
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Tel:3122860561
Address:Edificio Camara de Comercio Piso 4 (Calle 14 Norte # 10 - 05 La Castellana
City:Quindi´o
Website:
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Tel:(6) 7371815
Address:Armenia) Calle 51 6-106 Bodega 4
City:Quindi´o
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Tel:+57 8 8327294. +57 3203359596
Address:Calle 9 # 14-29. El Pital
City: Huila. Colombia
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Contact:Javier Acevedo Pinto
Tel:+57 3188017643
Address:Calle 9 # 3-19a
City: Piedecuesta. Santander.
Website:
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Tel:(6) 3459296/3113442838
Address:Calle 22 Carrera 8 Esquina Edificio Camara de Comercio Of 1503/ Carrera
City:Risaralda
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Tel:+57 8 636 1045 - +57 314 481 3225
Address:
City:Casanare
Contact:Pedro de Narváez
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Tel: +57 1 311 7925- +57 315 882 1614.
Address: Calle 78 No. 27 – 32.
City:Bogota
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Contact:Alvaro H. Campuzano Florez
Tel:+57 318558021
Address:Calle 14 No 26-20      401
City:Risaralda
Website:
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Tel:3112129047/3108511250
Address:Carrera 10 6 - 71 Valle de San Jose´
City:Santander
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Contact:Jose Luis Rojas / Yuliana Rodríguez
Tel:(571) 3118274755- (571)3118172864
Address:Carrera 9 No 13 -25 Centro Comercial Don Juan de Castellanos
City:Villa de Leyva - Boyacá,Colombia.
Website:
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Tel:76198975
Address:Calle 143 26 - 02 Torre B Apt 601 Barrio Condado Campestre
City:Santander
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ROASTER ROUNDTABLE

ROASTER ROUNDTABLE

Our mission is to contribute to the success of the coffee roasting community.

Our vision: To become the largest community of coffee roasters on the globe.

This site is under construction. Please share with us your ideas as to what information should be included for the benefit of the roasting community.

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USA

Allegra Marketing Inc.
25 Basin Rd.
Sunapee, NH 03782
(603) 235-9310
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COLOMBIA

Digital Circulation S.A.S.

Calle 131a # 19-89
Bogota D.C.
(57) 301 489 0914

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Direct Trade

Direct Trade

Direct trade is a term applied to the process of purchasing and sourcing coffee. It is used in many different ways and means many different things in different contexts. 

In the broadest sense, direct trade indicates that that the original producer and the coffee roasting company can identify each other. All trade—of coffee, tea, cocoa, grains, fruit, clothes, electronics—involves a supply chain in which products are moved across borders and between warehouses as they are processed and turned from raw materials into foodstuffs or useable goods. 

Coffee is unique in that, compared to other products, it involves minimal process and remains a discrete entity from the tree until it reaches the consumer. In this way, it is easier to trace coffee as it moves through its supply chain than it is to trace the chocolate and sugar in a candy bar or the cotton in our jeans.
In order to move physical products between their countries of origin and all the places in which they will be consumed, things are aggregated and distributed multiple times. As Direct Trade coffee moves along its supply chain (or through its supply web), the theory is that it retains its specific identity and does not become homogenized at any of its points of aggregation or distribution. 

To illustrate, here are three examples of direct trade coffee that involve different parties playing various roles. 

1. Several employees from a cafe-roaster in the US travel to Panama. They have the contact information for several coffee producers given to them by friends who used to live in Panama's mountainous agricultural region. They meet the farmers, tour their lands, taste some of the current harvest, and negotiate the price of the specific lots they want, about 50 bags in total. Back in the US, they hire an importing company to add those 50 bags to a container shipping out of Panama at the end of the harvest. The importing company pays the producers at the price the roasting company negotiated, essentially financing the transaction. When the coffee arrives in the US, the importer releases the coffee from the warehouse and the roaster pays the importer. In this case, the roaster initiated the transaction and the importer facilitated it. 

2. An importer has a longstanding history of buying from an exporter, who processes coffee from many small producers at their dry mill in Guatemala. The exporter is separating lots from different farmers by processing them individually, rather than as a large group. An importer organizes a sourcing trip for roasters to visit individual producers and tour the exporter's mill. Roasters select different lots and the importer buys a few extra in order to fill a container. When the coffee lands in the US, the importer distributes the specific lots to the roasters who selected them and sells the additional lots as spot coffee to other roasters.

Those spot coffees are also considered direct trade because there is transparent information that traces the coffee from the specific producer to the final roaster. 

Here, the importer and the exporter initiated the transaction by acting as liaisons between producers and roasters who otherwise might not have known each other. 

3. A producer who owns a midsize farm in Quindio, Colombia with its own processing mill travels to a coffee event in the US. He brings samples of his coffee and information about his family's farm and operation. He meets with roasters who try his coffee and order their favorite lots based on processing method and cup score. Back at origin, the producer exports his own container and has a US broker to help bring the container in. He distributes the lots to the different roasters who ordered them. Several months later, a few of the roasters travel to the farms to better understand the source of the coffee they purchased. 

In this case, the producer was able to initiate the transaction by actively seeking buyers and complete the transaction by dedicating time and resources to handle the logistics himself. 

These three scenarios all qualify as direct trade because, even though there are many parties involved to get the coffee from the farm to the roaster, those parties all ensure that the coffee remains as an isolated lot identified by its specific qualities and provenance.  There are many other paths that are also direct trade. Traceable, transparent coffee is as variable in its movement from farm to cafe as bulk coffee. The difference is that the original source of the coffee is never obscured and that coffee from different farms is not blended, such that the person drinking the final cup of coffee can put a real name and face to the people who first produced it.



-Rachel Northrop is a contributor for the Specialty Coffee Magazine and the writer of When Coffee Speaks.

Relationship Coffee
Photo Credit: Landon Yost
RACHEL NORTHROP is a contributor for Specialty Coffee Magazine. Her articles focus on agriculture, environmental and economic sustainability at origin, emerging US roasters and retailers, and the personal narratives of people involved at all points along the supply chain. She began researching coffee production in 2012 for the book When Coffee Speaks: Stories from and of Latin American Coffeepeople. She works as the Northeast US & Canada rep for Ally Coffee’s specialty division. Read more at whencoffeespeaks.com.
 
World Coffee Producers Forum Update “Most anticipated event for the coffee industry in 2017”

World Coffee Producers Forum Update “Most anticipated event for the coffee industry in 2017”

By Rachel Northrop

June 5, 2017

World Coffee Producers Forum is the Most Anticipated Event for the Coffee Industry in 2017 In just over a month the coffee industry will convene for the most anticipated event of the year: the first annual World Coffee Producers Forum.

This global gathering will take place in Medellin, Colombia July 10-12 and the speakers, panelists, and moderators represent the coffee industry's most innovative minds from across continents and sectors of the supply chain.

The focuses of the forum are on adapting to climate change, strengthening rural economies, and planning for long term strength of an industry rooted in smallholder agriculture. Keynote speaker Jeffrey Sachs, Director of Columbia University's Center for Sustainable Development at the Earth Institute will set the tone by addressing coffee’s place the global economics of world agriculture

influenced by a shifting climate.

The first panel, moderated by Fred Kawuma, Secretary General of the Inter African Coffee Organization, will tackle Economic Sustainability of the Coffee Producer. Experts speaking to solutions for challenges of increasing incomes to farmers who are the first affected by climate change include Annette Pensel, Executive Director of the precompetitive Global Coffee Platform, which recently designed a new farmer-centric framework with the Sustainable Coffee Platform, and Chris von Zastrow, Director of Coffee Sustainability for Starbucks.

The second panel, moderated by Ronald Peters, Executive Director of Costa Rica’s ICAFE, will discuss Rural Development and Socioeconomic Indicators of the Coffee World. Sharing innovations in food and agricultural policy and rural economies will be panelists representing the World Bank, Latin America’s Promecafe, African Fine Coffees Association, and Conservation International.

The final panel, moderated by Chief Technical Officer of Colombia’s National Federation of Coffee Growers, Hernando Duque, tackles Adaptation to Climate Change in Coffee Production. Experts addressing changing temperature and weather conditions are Corey Watts, whose recent report “A Brewing Storm, The Climate Change Risks to Coffee” examines the pressure climate change exerts on already vulnerable producers, representatives of Brazil and Madagascar producers’ organizations, and the head of green coffee development for Nestle.

The presence of influential decision makers from both producer advocacy groups, private roaster-retailer companies, intergovernmental agencies, and research institutions indicates the intense level of collaboration taking place between all members of the coffee supply chain to advocate for increased co-responsibility, where all stakeholders are aware of the challenges facing others at different points along the chain so that long term planning accounts for the health of the entire industry, not just the immediate interests of one sector.

During the lunch session, Dr. Andrea Illy, chairman of Illy cafe, SpA, will propose a Global Arabica Plan (GAP) that intends to respond to climate’s effect on coffee by changing agronomical practices, developing new resistant cultivars, and migrating production areas.

The World Coffee Producers Forum promises to be an invaluable opportunity to take conversations that have been happening at the local level across the coffee growing world and channel them into cohesive actions that will take proactive steps to strengthen coffee production in the new global climate reality.

-Rachel Northrop . Specialty Coffee Magazine.



Relationship Coffee
Photo Credit: Landon Yost
RACHEL NORTHROP is a contributor for Specialty Coffee Magazine. Her articles focus on agriculture, environmental and economic sustainability at origin, emerging US roasters and retailers, and the personal narratives of people involved at all points along the supply chain. She began researching coffee production in 2012 for the book When Coffee Speaks: Stories from and of Latin American Coffeepeople. She works as the Northeast US & Canada rep for Ally Coffee’s specialty division. Read more at whencoffeespeaks.com.
 
Social Campaign

Social Campaign

Specialty Coffee Magazine is proud to present a new section in our magazine, “Social Campaign”. This section serves to reach out to caring members of global coffee community who are willing and able to contribute to a good cause. This is the case of a coffee grower in Colombia. We hope you can help.

A few weeks ago, Mrs. Cristina Mendoza, president of the International Women’s Coffee Alliance, contacted us regarding a member of her community who is in need of urgent surgical intervention. Her name is Ms. Oliva Montenegro, she is a native of Cauca, Colombia.

Ms. Montenegro is 58 years old and lives in the village of Union Gramalote del Corregimiento Uribe Municipality of El Tambo Cauca. She is a single mother raising her 6 children with the work of the farm. Her children could only attend elementary school because of their scarce economic resources. Currently, she takes care of one of her kids.

In 1982, Mrs. Montenegro traveled in search of work to the Cauca Valley but unfortunately carrying out work activities while loading containers, a piece of glass affected her right eye causing serious and irreversible injuries. The Doctors could not do anything to save her sight so that after a while they had to extract it and adapt a prosthesis. After the surgery she worked for a time and then decided to return to her estate.

For the last 10 years, she has been confronted with a visual problem which has manifested itself in glaucoma, causing the loss of 70% of her vision according to medical certification. Because of the nature of her progressive sight damage, Ms. Montenegro is in need of urgent surgical intervention.

Ms. Montenegro is one of the founding members of the association and very active in community work.

For more information about how you can help Ms. Montenegro, please email to:
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Relationship Coffee
Photo Credit: Landon Yost
RACHEL NORTHROP is a contributor for Specialty Coffee Magazine. Her articles focus on agriculture, environmental and economic sustainability at origin, emerging US roasters and retailers, and the personal narratives of people involved at all points along the supply chain. She began researching coffee production in 2012 for the book When Coffee Speaks: Stories from and of Latin American Coffeepeople. She works as the Northeast US & Canada rep for Ally Coffee’s specialty division. Read more at whencoffeespeaks.com.
 
The Sourcing Process: Understanding Microlot Pricing

The Sourcing Process: Understanding Microlot Pricing

By Rachel Northrop

Historically, Arabica coffee price discovery and valuation have been based on a commodity market where the futures contract unit corresponds to the volume of physical coffee in a shipping container. Today, with ample demand for much smaller lots of coffee demonstrating more nuanced sensorial attributes than the regional qualities, which are assigned premiums or discounts in commodity trade, a new system is emerging for outright pricing based on costs of production, sensorial quality, and rarity. The development of new price discovery and valuation criteria reflects a trend across the coffee industry towards promoting financial sustainability of smallholder producers at one end of the chain and luxury lifestyle products at the other.

Coffee sales can be initiated in three main ways: buyers searching for sellers, importers and exporters connecting buyers and sellers, or sellers offering coffee to buyers. While it is more common today than ever for producers and roasters to visit each other in their home countries to see how coffee is grown and how it is served to customers, information about coffee flows more fluidly than the physical coffee itself, which must still traverse thousands of miles and travel out of at least one country and into another.

To facilitate the physical supply flow, the commodity system developed to promote consistency and reliable quality from specific regions of producing countries, always shipping coffee in full containers. Now that coffee professionals are exploring the possibilities of separating coffee into small lots based on where, when, and how it was grown and processed, these small batches retain distinct, individual qualities that make each lot a specific product. Buying and selling coffee in these microlot units is called the productization of coffee, where different products may share attributes but are not interchangeable in the way that commodities, by definition, are.

Commodity pricing is based on this concept of equivalency and is driven by the many factors—currency exchange rates, major weather events, global supply and demand—that influence other major economic indicators. Because microlots of coffees are unique in that each one displays a different combination of producer narrative, terroir and sensory attributes, and available total volume, a different array of factors determine the price.

As producing nations have developed and cost of living has increased, the commodity market price no longer yields small farm owners and workers living wage. Location-specific cost of production is the base factor for microlot pricing. Because it is exponentially more work to produce coffee in tiny batches, producers can only invest in this added effort if they can afford to put in the time. As with any business, the cost of making a product is calculated by accounting for the raw materials used, the price of labor, taxes and fees, and fixed costs related to land/infrastructure maintenance.

Therefore, microlot coffee is expensive even if it does not taste as delicious as everyone hopes. When small lots of coffee also meet high sensory standards, such as the Specialty Coffee Association’s rubric for assessing quality, then the lots further increase in price. High scoring coffee will always sell for a premium.

Finally, the rarity of a particular coffee, given many components that converge to yield a specific sensory profile, combined with measurable quality of a lot, drive price based on demand and scarcity. The primary example of this is Panama Geisha coffee. There is comparatively little coffee of the Geisha varietal planted and Panama’s farms are modest in size and produce a limited harvest. What they do produce consistently scores at top levels. There is a very limited supply of coffee that combines the sensory attributes of Panama’s volcanic terroir and the Geisha varietal. A small segment of this limited supply achieves close to perfect scores according to industry metrics, making the final product both impartially high quality and very rare. Panama uses the US dollar and has comparatively high costs of production. The result is coffee that exists in microlots of only several hundred pounds, selling for at or above $100.00/lb.

The more name recognition farms and producing families earn, the greater the demand without the capacity to increase supply. As with popular brands in any other industry, the combination of limited supply, demonstrable quality, and popular demand drives up price.

It is important to remember that microlot pricing is not determined by sensorial quality alone; creating separate lot registration, shipping documentation, customs declaration, warehouse intake, warehouse load out, and invoicing for each microlot of coffee also demands an increase in professional labor in both producing and consuming countries. Tracking and physically moving so many small lots of coffee is a costly activity. The result is a spectrum of distinctive, delicious coffees, but coffees that require a premium for all the added effort that went into making them, not all of which work directly correlates to added points in the final cup.

-Rachel Northrop is a contributor for the Specialty Coffee Magazine and the writer of When Coffee Speaks. 



Relationship Coffee
Photo Credit: Landon Yost
RACHEL NORTHROP is a contributor for Specialty Coffee Magazine. Her articles focus on agriculture, environmental and economic sustainability at origin, emerging US roasters and retailers, and the personal narratives of people involved at all points along the supply chain. She began researching coffee production in 2012 for the book When Coffee Speaks: Stories from and of Latin American Coffeepeople. She works as the Northeast US & Canada rep for Ally Coffee’s specialty division. Read more at whencoffeespeaks.com.